Next Thursday I’ll be interviewing Patrisse Khan-Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, about the meaning and practice of liberation, the elusive quest for racial justice, and the necessity of building sustainable, revolutionary movements rooted in…

Not surprisingly, on the 50th anniversary of King’s assassination, there’s been a flood of tributes – many of them predictable and familiar: “We’ve come along way and still have a long way to go”, etc. Thankfully deeper reflections can be found in th…

I know that I’m not alone in feeling sick and tired of being sick and tired of police killings of unarmed people. My heart breaks for Stephon Clark’s family and all those in Sacramento who’ve been struggling for years to get the Sacramento police to b…

23Mar

My good friend Pastor Mike breaks it down brilliantly in this video and article. He explains: “In the past decade, some have urged us to trust the process and to leave race and poverty out of the discussion. Broad gun policies, the argument goes, will most certainly reduce urban gun violence. In the aftermath of mass shootings, some leaders have counseled political pragmatism and even silence regarding gun violence in major cities, cautioning that we might lose ‘white allies’ and miss the political moment. And so, at the end of each ‘political moment,’ youths of color go unheard. . . . While we do believe in common-sense gun reform, the debate shouldn’t be dominated by the National Rifle Association or gun-control advocates who lack an anti-racism lens. Mass shootings constitute just 3 percent of gun homicides in this country, and, as horrific as they are, we must also insistently push conversations about urban gun violence, the enormous number of gun suicides (which outnumber gun homicides) and the toxic masculinity that fuels domestic violence. We must also challenge the gun violence prevention coalitions that raise hundreds of millions of dollars but invest little money in black- and brown-led organizations doing anti-violence and peacemaking work daily. And we must also take every opportunity to help the public learn to hear what youths of color have to say about stopping the violence.”

My good friend Pastor Mike breaks it down brilliantly in this video and article. He explains: “In the past decade, some have urged us to trust the process and to leave race and poverty out of the discussion. Broad gun policies, the argument goes, wil…

“Black boys raised in America, even in the wealthiest families and living in some of the most well-to-do neighborhoods, still earn less in adulthood than white boys with similar backgrounds, according to a sweeping new study that traced the lives of mi…